The VRSciT project (2020-1-PT01-KA204-078597) has been funded with support from the European Commission. This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

A hedonic motivation model in virtual reality tourism: Comparing visitors and non-visitors

Study Field
STEAM, Environmental Education, Culture and tourism
Summary
Hedonic motivation adoption frameworks with flow state and subjective well-being have been shown to have significant roles in the continued use of information technology. However, research on a theoretically integrated hedonic motivation system adoption model (HMSAM) specifically with enjoyment, flow state, subjective wellbeing, and continued use has not previously been conducted concerning VR tourism. This study develops and investigates a conceptually comprehensive model on the effect of consumers’ hedonic behaviors on continued use, with the moderating role of visitor or non-visitor at the destination portrayed in VR tourism.
Innovative VR tools and techniques
● Hedonic motivation adoption frameworks with flow state and subjective well-being have been shown to have significant roles in the continued use of information technology.
● Perceived easiness of using VR activities insignificantly influence the flow state from VR use.
● Technicians can augment flow components of their VR tourism content with audio, video, and haptics along with 3D printing technology so that consumers can receive psychologically subjective well-being from using the VR.
VR in education
● The findings suggest that VR content producers should focus on generating hedonic motivations because the effects of perceived enjoyment and flow state were found to significantly impact consumers’ continued usage of VR tourism within the HMSAM. That is, VR producers could design their content to have enjoyable, funny, and happy elements by using gamification so that consumers obtain hedonic experiences from the VR.
● The relationship between flow state and continued use via subjective well-being is much stronger than the relationship between flow state and continued use. VR tourism developers may boost consumers’
● VR can play a significant role in encouraging visitation and engaging in particular travel activities and behaviors.
● Highly significant effect of consumers’ perceived enjoyment on flow state and of flow state on subjective well-being.
● Flow theory has been applied to information technologies to understand users’ behavior on compulsive smartphone use, mobile social networking, and online shopping.
● VR users’ flow state has a significant effect on their subjective well-being.
● The results of this study in the VR context are consistent with those of previous research that hedonic performance expectancy (e.g., enjoyment) is found to be significantly related to cognitive absorption (e.g., flow state) in acceptance of hedonic volitional contexts (e.g., Facebook).
● High subjective well-being from using VR activities leads to consumers’ continued VR use.
● Visitors who went to destinations or attractions after they had been shown to them in VR, the perceived usefulness is more likely to influence their flow state when using VR content.
● The findings suggest that VR content producers should focus on generating hedonic motivations because the effects of perceived enjoyment and flow state were found to significantly impact consumers’ continued usage of VR tourism within the HMSAM. That is, VR producers could design their content to have enjoyable, funny and happy elements by using gamification so that consumers obtain hedonic experiences from the VR.
● The relationship between flow state and continued use via subjective well-being is much stronger than the relationship between flow state and continued use, VR tourism developers may boost consumers’ subjective well-being to increase their usage of VR tourism. In other words, developers can highlight VR tourism-related programs to be satisfied, gratified, and contented by utilizing the technology of artificial intelligence.
Reference
Kim M., Michael C. (2019). A hedonic motivation model in virtual reality tourism: Comparing visitors and non-visitor. International Journal of Information Management. Vol 46, P. 236-249.

The VRSciT Project

The VRSciT project (2020-1-PT01-KA204-078597) has been funded with support from the European Commission. This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.